True stories about being married to a TV Meteorologist

Tag Archives: Wife of a weatherman

For those who don’t live in tornado ally, or for those fortunate to have a basement, you have never had to experience the logistics of getting into a storm shelter. Having grown up in Illinois, I was fortunate enough to have a basement. I can count on one hand how many times my family and I had to go down to the basement for a tornado warning. The few times we went down to the basement (after looking outside for the tornado first) we had over 1,000 sq. ft. of space, plenty of room for my parents, brother, dog and me  to have personal space so we didn’t totally annoy each other for the 15-minutes we were down there.

In Oklahoma only 1% of the population has a basement. That’s right only 1%, that is CRAZY when you think about the number of tornadoes the state sees on an annual basis, why is that? Geologists say that basement walls will crack due to the red clay that absorbs moisture and drys out in the heat which creates a contraction and expansion of the concrete. That in addition to high water tables is a recipe for disaster, and your pocket-book, so Oklahoman’s just don’t bother with it. Instead, us Okies resort to life-saving storm shelters.

There are 3 types of storm shelters:

  1. Underground Shelters
  2. Concrete Shelters
  3. Safe Rooms

All 3 shelters have been proven to save people’s lives in an EF5 tornado and when it comes to surviving a natural disaster, you will get into one of those 3 options with no hesitancy. They aren’t cheap, they all start off at a few thousand dollars each, so while I’d love for every resident in Oklahoma to have one (and I think they should be mandatory in each structure built here), not everyone can afford them. For those who do not have a shelter, make sure you are educated on how to protect yourself at home, the office or at a shopping center.

What’s great about being an Okie, is that everyone comes together during severe weather. Tornadoes, hail, earthquakes are all a lifestyle. For those who don’t have a shelter, they know they are welcome to their neighbor’s home if s*it gets real, no questions asked. Adults, kids, pets…all of them will take shelter together in whatever storm shelter is available.

Personally speaking, I have an underground shelter in my garage. To give you a visual it looks like an oil lube pit, torture chamber, bomb shelter, a 4’7″ dark abyss and a claustrophobic’s worst nightmare. But remember, they are made for survival, not comfort. You won’t find anyone hanging out in a storm shelter for fun (unless changing their car oil, which we’ve done, don’t judge, it’s practical).

Now here is where being the wife of a meteorologist get’s exciting. My weatherman meteorologist husband will ALWAYS be working during a severe weather day, leaving me home alone with a baby and two 70-lb dogs who are absolutely petrified of getting into said abyss.

Logistically speaking, getting two huge, stubborn dogs into a dark abyss while having a toddler either walking, crying, screaming, running, back-bending, laying down, or anything else a toddler can think to do at the worst possible time, will be impossible. One solution Aaron and I came up with is putting the Pet Loader into the shelter which will hopefully give the dogs more stair-width  for me to shove, kick, hurl, throw, and/or wrestle them down into by myself.

We have done plenty of practice-runs with the dogs to prepare us for the inevitable, and while our fat lab has caught onto using the Pet Loader and trusting that we have a reason and purpose for her to be down in the dark abyss, our sensitive pit-boxer mix is just beside 1376486_10100874719152992_1751939248_nherself each time. She tucks her tail and retreats to the furthest corner of the garage and begins shaking like we are going to torture her. *she reminds me of the dog in Hyperbole and a Half, if you haven’t read this blog and have ever owned a dog, it’s amazing and you will crack up*

So, when you see a tornado warning in Oklahoma City, think of me, home…alone, with a toddler acting out in some way or another, and two 70-lb dogs (one is fat, one is shaking) trying to get into our underground storm shelter that is 4’7″ high, dark and loud. I will be that person that waits til the last-minute to get into the shelter because it will be traumatizing for all of us (also part of my diabolical plan to drive my husband crazy), but you bet your ass I’ll have each of them down there safe.There may be a few broken bones with the shoving and wrestling of the dogs, but I’d rather have a dog w a broken leg than no dog at all.

Hopefully I will never need to figure out the logistics of getting into a storm shelter, but if  I do, there is a plan.

 

 

 

 

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Well, it finally happened. I finally saw my first tornado on May 23, 2016 in Woodward, Oklahoma. I have been waiting for my husband to catch me one for five years. We have gone chasing a handful of times on very promising days and at the most saw hail. I thought I was bad luck! Whenever I’d go out on a chase, the day would fizzle. The days I would stay back, he’d see amazing tornadoes.

I have a love/hate relationship when it comes to chasing, and I have a list of ‘tornado-must-haves’ for the tornado I want to see. You see, I absolutely hate driving. I hate being in the car for extended periods of time, in the middle of no where, with no one around; quite simply it makes me very anxious. I am not one of those people that loves the open road and having no one around. I mean, what if a tire blew or I choke on food? So days I actually go chasing, I have to be in the right state-of-mind. Aaron and I have his favorite weather app (Radar Scope) running the entire time that shows other chasers in the area and depicts them as little dots on the map. Call me crazy, but I get comfort in seeing those little dots around us when we’re in butt-f*ck Oklahoma, Kansas, Texas, Nebraska, etc…

My ‘must-have’ list for a tornado consists of the following:
1. The tornado must be within a few hours of my starting point so I don’t have to be in the car for 14+ hours.
2. The tornado can only hit fields, it can’t hit a populated area.
3. References to the movie Twister must happen as often as possible.
4. The tornado must be obvious. It must have that iconic wedge look to it.
5. It must be accessible to see and chase on a paved road. I don’t want to be stuck in mud in the middle of no where (what if the dots can’t find us?)
6. A ‘selfie’ opportunity is a must.

Our day started off…hesitant. Aaron wasn’t sure if the storm would develop or not. It was a promising day, all the ingredients for a tornado were there, but it wasn’t certain. After a few hours of careful forecasting and analysis on his part, we decided to get on the road and chase the storm 2 hours to our West. I love my husband,I support him, I know he knows what he’s doing, but given my track record, I was preparing for a bust. In my mind, this was a fun little road trip with my hubby to western Oklahoma, so, I started the road trip playlist and began taking photos for my blog of me being bored waiting for a tornado that was never going to happen.

I know, I know, it was kind of mean of me, but in my defense, I hadn’t seen a tornado in 5 years. I played the part of navigator (which is comical, because I’m very bad at it) while he forecasted. He would stare out the window at the clouds and make predictions based off what the clouds were doing. He was one step away from grabbing the dirt and becoming a human barometer. He was definitely channeling his inner Bill Harding, while I was more like Melissa, drink in hand saying “Hey where’re we going?” Except looking back at it, since I was navigator I should have known…huh…now I’m thinking I didn’t really play a roll at all that day.

Aaron’s human barometer skills were on point. We had been parked in Woodward, OK for about a half hour trying to determine if anything was going to happen or if we should cut our losses and head back to OKC. He saw something in the clouds radarscope , and decided to drive north. And wouldn’t you know it? There wasn’t a tornado…nope, not yet at least. The storm, as I learned, was cycling.  Yes, I learned all about the life cycle of a tornado, what scud, downdrafts, and outflows all were.

The storm was teasing me. It looked promising, looked like the tornado was going to drop, then it would cycle out (I don’t know if that’s the right terminology, but that’s what I’m saying). We ended up waiting an hour for the storm to mature. Then it happened. Not only did the tornado finally drop, but it hit everything on my ‘must-have’ list. It was incredible. I learned that it was the ‘best’ tornado experience because it didn’t move, it stayed in one spot and it stayed there for a long time, long enough for me to take a tornadoie (that’s right, a tornado selfie).

It was glorious! I have officially crossed seeing a tornado off my bucket list because I finally saw my first tornado!


If I had a nickel for every time someone asked me ‘what is the weather going to be today?’ I’d literally have tens of dollars. But, it is a reality I am faced with with every severe weather season and with any threat of moisture that comes out of the sky.What's the weather going to be today? I suddenly become everyone’s go-to person because I am married to the weatherman meteorologist. It’s like they think I am privy to secret weather information; that I’ll be able to tell them the exact time, wind speed, accumulation, etc. that will hit their house that day.

April and May in Oklahoma are my least favorite months for various reasons, including:

  1. I don’t see my husband
  2. There is no such thing as a schedule (see previous blog  here.)
  3. I suddenly need to act as media spokesman for the friends and co-workers to educate everyone on what to expect for weather events that day/week.
  4. My phone blows up with “Is there going to be a tornado?” “Do I need to seek shelter?”

But what you don’t know is on severe weather outbreak days my husband is doing 12-15+ hour long days, prepping, chasing, forecasting, phoning into the station, working behind the scenes literally answering all the questions viewers want to know. There is no time for him to tell the storm “hold on so I can text my wife and let her know what the weather is in her backyard.” From me to you, I might hear from him once or twice on a severe weather day simply as a status update, otherwise I have to watch the news just like everyone else.

My advice to you is, turn on the news, the weathermen meteorologists will give you the most accurate information and will break it down by the minute and literally tell you if it’s going to hit your house or not. The behind the scenes action is incredible on severe weather days. While you see one to two weatherman meteorologists on air, there are double to triple the people behind the green screen, looking at new models coming in, getting viewer photos to share, communicating with the chasers, creating new graphics, etc. Then you have all the storm chasers out on the road following every single major storm cell to inform the viewers exactly where it is and where it is going. All 3 major stations in Oklahoma City have helicopter pilots that are on the storm to provide a birds-eye-view of what the storm is acting like. And all of that are only the storm teams! This doesn’t even go into the newsroom and all the reporters and anchors and what they are putting together to inform everyone what’s happened when a storm blows through. storm chasers

I’ve asked Aaron if he could so kindly take a break to text me if a tornado is headed towards our neighborhood, or at least give me a personal shout-out on air, he said he could do that, so to any friends we have in the surrounding area, I will do my best to text you personally if there is a need to worry. But again, my advice to you is be prepared. Have your storm shelter ready, or have a safe room to go to in your home, don’t go driving around running errands if you know a storm is headed your way, have a weather radio, download your favorite local station’s weather apps, and tune in to the local channels see exactly what’s happening.


My baby went viral when he was 8-days old. Not many people can say that. It’s a blessing and a curse. Obviously I wanted everyone to see how amazingly cute and perfect he was, so the perfect platform was to debut him on his daddy’s on air broadcast; but the anxiety behind the scenes that lead up to him going viral was out of this world.

google all the things

It was stressful enough going through 9-months of pregnancy and going through birth; but after all that is done our entire life had been changed forever. When we brought that little person home, nothing was ever going to be the same, and our family of two had to morph into a family of three and find our new ‘norm’. It was a crazy whirlwind of “now what do we do?” and “is that normal?” or “am I doing this right?” We were amazed that we could actually keep baby alive hour to hour because we had no idea what we were doing. Google became my  best friend. All the prep work and research I did during pregnancy went out the window and I suddenly acted like I had a frontal lobotomy. My brain was mush. I had no idea what I was doing. I was in survival mode.  IMG_1512

When Caden was 5-days old we had to do the Pinterest thing and get his newborn photos taken. Seems easy enough, right? Just feed baby, give him a bath, change him, pack him up, drive to the photographer; take an hour’s worth of photos, call it a day, wait a few weeks and get adorable family portraits and baby photos back, post photos on Facebook to show off your perfect new family of three and no one will know all the chaos, anxiety, and crying that lead up to it! I call bullshit on any newborn photoshoot. The perfect images you see are equivalent to wearing a blood diamond. It’s a nice end product, but you don’t want to know what went into getting there. I will tell you what goes into it. New parents have a 5-day old baby that is on no schedule. Baby does what they want, when they want, and the parents just have to go with it and run around like a bunch of lunatics to get baby ready. Stepping out of the door and getting into the car is a whole new ballgame when a baby is involved.

The car ride over, Caden cried the entire time & Aaron and I were arguing about how late we were, and how we were going to be late to everything the rest of our lives and how we need to plan better in the future and blah, blah, blah. The poor photographer had to put up with us being overly tired, exhausted, and mad. I literally told her to just take the baby and do what she needed. I didn’t care at that point. I told her to take the naked photos of baby, use her props, work her magic, so I could sit down and take a breather. Could I even sit down for 5-minutes? NO! Baby needed fed! At this point I just whipped out my boob for all to see, let baby nurse, gave him back to her, started crying, and stepped outside to pout. Yes, I took a mommy time-out. Yay hormones. So, why I dive into all of this is to set a precedence to what was needed to get Caden on-air ready.

We decided last minute to put Caden on-air. HAHA, I know, what the heck were we thinking? My mom had come into town at that point, so we had a 3rd adult with us, a real adult, who wasn’t sleep deprived and had her wits about her, so I felt confident with her help we could do it. We were able to feed and bathe baby, get him in the car, and drive him to the station.

(Side note: on our way there, the truck in front of me on the highway lost the couch on the truck-bed. A huge couch fell in front of my car, on the highway, with a newborn in the backseat. If that doesn’t give you a minor heart attack, I don’t know what does. Don’t worry, I came to a stop and swerved out of the way, but you can imagine the adrenaline I had pumping through me by the time we got to the station, I believe that adrenaline push is what allowed the on-air appearance to happen).

Aaron and I carefully planned the song and dance that was about to happen. He’d step on screen, I’d have baby off to the side, he’d motion to me to hand baby to him, he’d easily accept baby, do an entire weathercast, and hand baby to me if needed. Sounds simple enough right? Well what you see in the video below makes it all look like that, but what you don’t know is Aaron had never held a baby before, and was still VERY uncomfortable with Caden. So the very thought of me just handing an 8-day old baby over to him was a lot more difficult than one would think. I had to place baby in his arms so that he didn’t have to adjust him all while he seamlessly continued the weathercast without pause or any ‘um’s, ah’s or em’s’. I gave baby to him, (in my mind I was praying he didn’t drop him), when baby started to fuss, I took him back, and Aaron finished his weathercast. To the viewers it was great! To me, I was sweating bullets wondering how my boys were going to pull it off.

Thankfully next to the weather center there are soundproof editing booths that I ran into with the now screaming baby during the newscast. I don’t think the viewers heard, but I have no idea. I was just hoping it was all done successfully. I stayed in the soundproof booth for the rest of the show, lights off, boob out, nursing baby, and one-step away from wearing a strait jacket in a real padded booth.

By the next day, my baby went viral. The weather segment was featured as the ‘feel-good’ story in over 15 cities and was all over Facebook.

Baby went viral at 8-days old

The “what the heck did I get myself into” face


We did it! We had our baby! Please welcome Mr. Caden Brackett into the world!!! He’s the IMG_1648best thing that has ever happened and we are blessed to have him with us. It was an incredible journey to go on for 40 weeks, but it was worth it. Coming up with a name was challenge No. 1. Apparently, when you’re a weatherman meteorologist you know a lot of ‘guys’ and because you ‘know a guy’ who did xyz in college that takes the name off the table for our baby. The name Bill Paxton Brackett was on the docket, but we decided against it at the last moment. Phew, dodged a bullet there! I like the movie Twister and all, but I need to draw the line somewhere! 40 weeks came and went and Mr. Caden decided to take his sweet time coming out. We were anxious for his arrival, but ready. The nursery was all set up, car seats were installed, overnight hospital bags were packed, and neighbors were set up to watch our two dogs. Caden was due on October 23rd, 2015. That day came and went with no indication of going into labor. To say we were disappointed would be an understatement. As any mom knows, when that due date comes, baby needs to come out ASAP! But, being his mother, I knew he was going to be stubborn about the whole thing and take his sweet time. Thank goodness he didn’t learn to be totally stubborn like me right off the bat, because labor started at 4:15 am the next morning.

4:15 am on October 24th, 2015 was a pivotal moment in the Brackett household. First, I had no idea what I was experiencing. I thought it was all in my head because I wanted it to happen, so naturally, I ignored my body and was in denial for a few hours before the pain got to be unbearable and I decided to wake up my husband. 6:30 am I wake Aaron up and verbatim say, “So, I think I might be having contractions.” I then bent over in agony and stated, “…but I’m not sure.” Haha! silly me. But when it’s your first kid, you really have no idea what is going on. The hospital doesn’t want to see you until the contractions are 5 min apart and last for 1 min long each. I was having contractions every 2-3 min at 40 seconds long each, therefore, I was not following the pattern the hospital required, so I didn’t see a need to go in just yet. This is where labor and delivery begins to mimic a storm chaser.

Storm chasers get into what I call “Go Mode”. They are very educated, they look at tons of maps, do a lot of math, and follow the severe weather at a safe distance. Their “Go Mode” is frantically looking at their phones and computers, freaking out a little bit (who am I kidding, a lot a bit) and putting the pedal-to-the-metal to get to where the storm is. They don’t always use full sentences, and often times are incoherent with the facts as their brains are moving a million miles a minute. There is an excitement in the air and a frantic-ness that something big is about to happen and if they take one extra second to tell you what is going on, all will be lost. Screeching tires on side-dirt roads in the middle of nowhere kick up dirt, there is a ton of yelling and ‘nerd-talk’. If you are unfortunate enough to be taking a bathroom break at the time, you may find yourself running out of said bathroom while pulling up your pants (again, who am I kidding, a bathroom? Ha! I mean peeing on the side of the road). Once they  make it into the chase car they are in they blast their ‘chasing music’ and begin arguing with each other on what route to take. Once they finally agree, it’s every-chaser for himself. Everyone eventually winds up around the same areas and either sees something or they don’t, but nonetheless its very exciting. To get a glimpse at the action, see the video below.

In a sense, labor and delivery is the same way. Go-mode happens and all the preparation a couple has taken the past 40-weeks to be ready goes out the window and all hell breaks loose. Once the couple accepts the fact that the baby is coming, there’s no stopping the storm that’s brewing (damn, I’m good at writing). Our personal story was Aaron packed the car as quickly as possible, I slumped over in pain, and we found ourselves in the car driving the speed limit to the hospital. The manageable cramping pain I had a few hours ago turned into my body turning against me and my organs wanting to tear themselves out of my body, twisting and stabbing me along the way. Yes, I was exactly what you see in the movies. I was that pregnant woman going through labor, closing my eyes, trying the Lamaze breathing (that is a joke) screaming at my husband to get to the hospital as fast as he can.

tmbvr

Luckily Aaron is a trained storm chasing, meteorologist, that always remains calm, cool, and collected under pressure.

avnzwat

HAHA, just kidding. We were frantic. We couldn’t get to the hospital quick enough. He put the pedal-to-the-metal and cranked that music up (no, he didn’t, I was very particular about not wanting to listen to anything or be touched), his sentences, and mine, were incoherent, we were screeching tires, passing traffic, there was arguing on which road to take, but we eventually got to the hospital. Then, as every storm chase that I’ve been on has ended with nothing happening. The hospital made us wait an hour to prove labor was moving along. This was the most excruciating hour of my life. Let me repeat, OF MY LIFE!!!! They said “walk around, it will help…” my reaction was something along the lines of:

giphy

But, long story short, I was admitted into the labor room and quickly given an epidural and became a little less crazy at that point:

tumblr_n6ug9dqj8d1r61bjyo1_250

13 hours later (might I mention, this is less time than any storm chase I’ve been on), our little miracle entered this world. Sure there were times where I was drugged out and when the nurses were talking to Aaron about storms and tornadoes I interjected with off the wall giphy1comments about football having them react like, “um, what?” And there were times that Aaron was white as a ghost in shock, disbelief, and utter disgust. But the day was beautiful, we had a healthy boy, and our lives were forever changed for the sleep-deprived better. I honestly couldn’t think about a better analogy for labor and delivery other than it mimics the total chaos of a storm chaser finding their tornado of the day.

 


The Weatherman Meteorologist is having a baby!

We found out in January 2015 that we are pregnant and expecting Baby Brackett in October! We are so excited to welcome little Brackett, but, we wanted to wait until after the first trimester to announce the news to the world.

When you become pregnant and make the announcement, it’s a wonderful feeling to hear all the ‘congratulations’ and excitement from friends and family. But when you have such a unique job, like a weatherman meteorologist, you get a lot of the same jokes, comments, and questions about your little one. So, to help answer all your questions, and to avoid hearing the same jokes over and over again, I thought I’d write down some of the things we’ve heard:

  1. Yes, he did make it rain that month.
  2. Yes, his ‘forecast’ was accurate as well.
  3. Yes I did expect a more than a few inches that night also.
  4. No, we won’t be naming our child after a weather term. There will be no: Summer, Autumn, April, Breeze, Bayou, Cloud, Frost, etc.
  5. Ok, you caught me I did consider one weather term for a middle name, I thought of the name Farrah for Fahrenheit, but then thought twice about it and decided, NO.
  6. Yes, we planned on not having a baby during a sweeps/ratings month.
  7. No, we won’t be shoving weather down the babe’s throat and force them to become a weatherman/or weatherwoman meteorologist.
  8. Yes, we think little baby weather books are adorable and Grandma Brackett may have hooked us up with one or two already 😉
  9. Yes, Aaron will be teaching the babe math and science, I will stay far away from both subjects and focus on teaching them other subjects (? TBD)
  10. Yes, our life insurance is good to go with Aaron storm chasing this season.
  11. I don’t know how I’m going to get down into our shelter if I need to take cover, I hoping the dogs will help me?
  12. Yes, I am expecting a onesie that says “My daddy is a weatherman meteorologist”
  13. No, Reed Timmer was nowhere to be found in his “Dominate-Her” vehicle, but if he was it’d look something like this:

reed-timmer-dominator-scream

We’ll keep you 4-warned about any new baby developments =) I look forward to all the new material you can come up with as these 13 are now off limits!



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