True stories about being married to a TV Meteorologist

Monthly Archives: March 2016

We did it! We had our baby! Please welcome Mr. Caden Brackett into the world!!! He’s the IMG_1648best thing that has ever happened and we are blessed to have him with us. It was an incredible journey to go on for 40 weeks, but it was worth it. Coming up with a name was challenge No. 1. Apparently, when you’re a weatherman meteorologist you know a lot of ‘guys’ and because you ‘know a guy’ who did xyz in college that takes the name off the table for our baby. The name Bill Paxton Brackett was on the docket, but we decided against it at the last moment. Phew, dodged a bullet there! I like the movie Twister and all, but I need to draw the line somewhere! 40 weeks came and went and Mr. Caden decided to take his sweet time coming out. We were anxious for his arrival, but ready. The nursery was all set up, car seats were installed, overnight hospital bags were packed, and neighbors were set up to watch our two dogs. Caden was due on October 23rd, 2015. That day came and went with no indication of going into labor. To say we were disappointed would be an understatement. As any mom knows, when that due date comes, baby needs to come out ASAP! But, being his mother, I knew he was going to be stubborn about the whole thing and take his sweet time. Thank goodness he didn’t learn to be totally stubborn like me right off the bat, because labor started at 4:15 am the next morning.

4:15 am on October 24th, 2015 was a pivotal moment in the Brackett household. First, I had no idea what I was experiencing. I thought it was all in my head because I wanted it to happen, so naturally, I ignored my body and was in denial for a few hours before the pain got to be unbearable and I decided to wake up my husband. 6:30 am I wake Aaron up and verbatim say, “So, I think I might be having contractions.” I then bent over in agony and stated, “…but I’m not sure.” Haha! silly me. But when it’s your first kid, you really have no idea what is going on. The hospital doesn’t want to see you until the contractions are 5 min apart and last for 1 min long each. I was having contractions every 2-3 min at 40 seconds long each, therefore, I was not following the pattern the hospital required, so I didn’t see a need to go in just yet. This is where labor and delivery begins to mimic a storm chaser.

Storm chasers get into what I call “Go Mode”. They are very educated, they look at tons of maps, do a lot of math, and follow the severe weather at a safe distance. Their “Go Mode” is frantically looking at their phones and computers, freaking out a little bit (who am I kidding, a lot a bit) and putting the pedal-to-the-metal to get to where the storm is. They don’t always use full sentences, and often times are incoherent with the facts as their brains are moving a million miles a minute. There is an excitement in the air and a frantic-ness that something big is about to happen and if they take one extra second to tell you what is going on, all will be lost. Screeching tires on side-dirt roads in the middle of nowhere kick up dirt, there is a ton of yelling and ‘nerd-talk’. If you are unfortunate enough to be taking a bathroom break at the time, you may find yourself running out of said bathroom while pulling up your pants (again, who am I kidding, a bathroom? Ha! I mean peeing on the side of the road). Once they  make it into the chase car they are in they blast their ‘chasing music’ and begin arguing with each other on what route to take. Once they finally agree, it’s every-chaser for himself. Everyone eventually winds up around the same areas and either sees something or they don’t, but nonetheless its very exciting. To get a glimpse at the action, see the video below.

In a sense, labor and delivery is the same way. Go-mode happens and all the preparation a couple has taken the past 40-weeks to be ready goes out the window and all hell breaks loose. Once the couple accepts the fact that the baby is coming, there’s no stopping the storm that’s brewing (damn, I’m good at writing). Our personal story was Aaron packed the car as quickly as possible, I slumped over in pain, and we found ourselves in the car driving the speed limit to the hospital. The manageable cramping pain I had a few hours ago turned into my body turning against me and my organs wanting to tear themselves out of my body, twisting and stabbing me along the way. Yes, I was exactly what you see in the movies. I was that pregnant woman going through labor, closing my eyes, trying the Lamaze breathing (that is a joke) screaming at my husband to get to the hospital as fast as he can.

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Luckily Aaron is a trained storm chasing, meteorologist, that always remains calm, cool, and collected under pressure.

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HAHA, just kidding. We were frantic. We couldn’t get to the hospital quick enough. He put the pedal-to-the-metal and cranked that music up (no, he didn’t, I was very particular about not wanting to listen to anything or be touched), his sentences, and mine, were incoherent, we were screeching tires, passing traffic, there was arguing on which road to take, but we eventually got to the hospital. Then, as every storm chase that I’ve been on has ended with nothing happening. The hospital made us wait an hour to prove labor was moving along. This was the most excruciating hour of my life. Let me repeat, OF MY LIFE!!!! They said “walk around, it will help…” my reaction was something along the lines of:

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But, long story short, I was admitted into the labor room and quickly given an epidural and became a little less crazy at that point:

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13 hours later (might I mention, this is less time than any storm chase I’ve been on), our little miracle entered this world. Sure there were times where I was drugged out and when the nurses were talking to Aaron about storms and tornadoes I interjected with off the wall giphy1comments about football having them react like, “um, what?” And there were times that Aaron was white as a ghost in shock, disbelief, and utter disgust. But the day was beautiful, we had a healthy boy, and our lives were forever changed for the sleep-deprived better. I honestly couldn’t think about a better analogy for labor and delivery other than it mimics the total chaos of a storm chaser finding their tornado of the day.

 

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